Q:

Do I need to hire an attorney for a criminal case?

A:

It is very risky to represent yourself in a criminal case. An attorney can help you obtain and review evidence in your case, recognize legal issues of which you are unfamiliar, use his relationship with prosecutors to negotiate on your behalf, and take the case to trial if necessary.

Q:

Where and when can we meet to discuss my case?

A:

We can meet at my office location or at an appropriate location that is convenient to you. I am available on evenings and weekends, subject to other court appearances and appointments.

Q:

What do I need to do while my case is pending?

A:

Work with me. Your willingness to be honest and to provide any important evidence to me will allow me to represent you more effectively. Also, be open to communication and understand that you might have to attend court several times, depending on your case.

Q:

What should I do when I'm arrested?

A:

Usually the answer is to be quiet and stop talking to the police, even if they try to interrogate or question you. While you should be respectful and compliant, that does not mean you should consent to a search of your car, cell phone, or other personal items. 

After you're booked in at the jail, you will be given the opportunity to call a relative or bonding company to post a bond if you're charged with a misdemeanor or a felony for which you're granted a bond. Depending on the charge, you might first have to appear in front of a magistrate judge to have your bond set. 

Whether you're released or not, you should seek the advice of counsel to figure out the best way to handle your charges going forward.

Q:

What should I do if I'm injured in an accident?

A:

The most important thing is your health. You should obtain the treatment necessary to treat and help heal your injuries. If you have health insurance that covers treatment, you should it.

If you have car insurance with collision coverage, you should notify your insurance company for repairs, and they can seek reimbursement from the at-fault driver's insurance company.

You should also contact an attorney to represent you who can help guide you through the process. He/she can communicate with the at-fault driver's insurance company, communicate with treatment providers about possible liens, obtain medical records, negotiate a settlement on your behalf, or file a lawsuit and litigate the case on your behalf if necessary.

Q:

Should I pay my traffic ticket online?

A:

If the offense is allowed to be paid online, and you do so, it is pleading guilty to the offense. If it's a moving violation, it will be reported to the Department of Driver Services and end up on your driving record.

If you go to a court, especially with an attorney, you can possibly get the charge reduced to a non-reportable offense or have the fine amount reduced. 

If you want to fight the ticket and have a trial, you must go to court and plead not guilty. Your case will be continued for a jury or bench trial, depending on which one you request. Witnesses, including police officers, will not be present or required to be present at your initial court hearing.